Kingsport Times News Monday, November 24, 2014

Local News

Sullivan superintendent gets high marks from BOE in recent evaluation

September 5th, 2012 11:42 pm by Rick Wagner

BLOUNTVILLE — Jubal Yennie’s “grades” have increased his sophomore year, going from a 2.96 his first year to 3.5 his second.


Sullivan County’s director of schools earned the 3.5 out of a possible 4 in his school board evaluation released Tuesday.


The immediate past Sullivan County Board of Education — two members different from the one that met Tuesday night — gave Yennie the evaluation. In his first evaluation, done in 2011 and reported to the BOE Sept. 6 of that year, he received a 2.96.


Yennie, who holds a doctoral degree, was hired away from Williamson County effective June 2010.


Based on 19 standards spread among six domains, Yennie was given a 1.0 for each rank of “developing,” a 2.0 for each “proficient,” 3.0 for each “accomplished” and 4.0 for each “distinguished.”


According to the evaluation analysis prepared by BOE attorney Pat Hull, Yennie received only one evaluation in the developing category on an Instructional Leadership standard and received 12 rankings for proficient, 35 for accomplished, and 84 for distinguished.


“This year the average is 3.50,” Hull told the board.


The board members who evaluated Yennie included former board Chairman Ron Smith and former member Jim Kiss, who were defeated in the Aug. 2 election.


Others participating in the evaluation were newly chosen board Chairman Dan Wells, newly chosen board Vice Chairman Jack Bales, Betty Combs, Robyn Ivester and Jerry Greene.


Newly elected board members Randall Jones and Todd Broughton, who were sworn in Tuesday, did not participate in the evaluation.


Following are the details:


•Under Domain I: Policy and Government: on Standard 1, “works with the school board to develop and implement policies that define organizational expectations,” Yennie got one proficient, one accomplished and five distinguished.


On Standard 2, “works with all individuals, groups, agencies, committees and organizations to provide and maintain schools that are safe and productive,” he got one accomplished and five distinguished with one not voting.


•Under Domain II: Planning and Assessment, on Standard 3, Performance Standard 3: “effectively employs various processes for gathering, analyzing and using data for decision making,” he got two accomplished and five distinguished, while on Standard 4, “organizes the collaborative development and implementation of a district strategic plan based on analysis of data from a variety of sources,” he got three distinguished and four accomplished. On Standard 5, “plans, implements, supports and assesses instructional programs that enhance teaching and student achievement of the state educational standards,” he got six distinguished and one accomplished. On Standard 6, “develops plans for effective allocation of fiscal and other resources,” he got five distinguished and two accomplished.


•Under Domain III: Instructional Leadership, for Standard 7, “communicates a clear vision of excellence and continuous improvement consistent with the goals of the school district,” he got five distinguished and two accomplished, while on Standard 8, “oversees the alignment, coordination and delivery of assigned programs and/or curricular areas,” he got six distinguished and one accomplished. On Standard 9, “selects, inducts, supports, evaluates and retains quality instructional and support personnel,” he got four distinguished, two accomplished and one proficient. On Standard 10, “provides staff development programs consistent with program evaluation results and school instructional improvement plans,” he got two distinguished, four accomplished and one proficient. On Standard 11, “identifies, analyzes and resolves problems using effective problem-solving techniques,” he got three distinguished, two accomplished, one proficient and one developing.


•For Domain IV: Organizational Management, on Standard 12, “actively supports a safe and positive environment for students and staff,” he got four distinguished, two accomplished and one proficient, while on Standard 13, “the superintendent effectively manages human, material and financial resources to ensure student learning and to comply with legal mandates,” he got five distinguished, one accomplished and one proficient. On Standard 14, “the superintendent demonstrates effective organizational skills to achieve school, community and district goals,” he got four distinguished, two accomplished and one proficient.


•For Domain V: Communication and Community Relations, for Standard 15, “promotes effective communication and interpersonal relations within the school district,” he received four distinguished, one accomplished and two proficient, while on Standard 16, “establishes and maintains effective channels of communication with board members and between the schools and community, strengthening support of constituencies and building coalitions,” he scored four distinguished, one accomplished and two proficient.


•And on Domain VI: Professionalism, on Standard 17, “models professionalism, moral and ethical standards as well as personal integrity in all interactions,” he got six distinguished and one proficient, while on Standard 18, “works in a collegial and collaborative manner with school personnel and the community to promote and support the mission and goals of the school district,” he got three distinguished and four accomplished and on Standard 19, “takes responsibility for and participates in a meaningful and continuous process of professional development that results in the enhancement of student learning,” he got five distinguished and two accomplished.


comments powered by Disqus