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Repair work will close Kingsport's new roundabout for 45 days

May 18th, 2012 3:59 am by Matthew Lane

Repair work will close Kingsport's new roundabout for 45 days

David Grace dgrace@timesnews.net Beginning the week of June 17, the new roundabout at the intersection of East Center Street, Netherland Inn Road and Industry Drive will be closed 45 days for repairs.

KINGSPORT — In less than a month the intersection of East Center Street, Netherland Inn Road and Industry Drive will be closed for 45 days while crews work to completely replace all of the concrete surrounding the roundabout , which has suffered from concrete failure since opening last year.


Kingsport opened the roundabout in August 2011 in an attempt to improve traffic flow through the heavily used three-way intersection and as an infrastructure improvement to help kick off redevelopment at the recently cleared Kingsport Landing area of town.


The $600,000 project was similar to other roundabouts in town, such as on Watauga Drive and Gibson Mill Road, where the concrete roundabout included a landscaped center and decorative, stamped concrete truck apron. This one also included two slip lanes to Netherland Inn Road and Center Street.


Soon after the roundabout opened for traffic, cracks began appearing around the edge of the truck apron, which have only gotten worse over time. City officials also found underperforming concrete in two locations along a roadway section of the roundabout.


“While it’s not a safety issue now, if you continue to have degradation of the concrete then it could end up with some problems,” said Public Works Director Ryan McReynolds.


After failed attempts to resolve the matter with Lyons Construction — the company that performed the work — city officials contacted the company’s bonding agent and insurance company, which are planning to cover the cost of replacing the concrete. McReynolds said there would be no additional cost to the city for the replacement work.


“The insurance company agreed there was enough information provided by the testing, they felt comfortable just replacing it all,” McReynolds said. “There was a good indication there was going to be problems with the other flatwork, and if there is continual degradation of the concrete, it would have to be replaced well before the life of the concrete.”


Read the expanded version of this report in today's print edition of the Times-News or its enhanced electronic edition.

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