Kingsport Times News Thursday, October 2, 2014
Local News

Briefs

April 12th, 2007 12:45 am by Staff Report










300 tongue rings reported stolen


Arrests expected soon in Va. shooting


Lee woman sentenced on drug charge


Jonesville woman gets 2 years for forgery


Health Fair planned for Friday


Friday is Fun Day at V.O. Dobbins


New pharmacy schools springing up


300 tongue rings reported stolen

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BULLS GAP - The Hawkins County Sheriff's Office is investigating a residential burglary last week in which several items including 300 tongue rings were reported stolen. The victim, David Moser, 28, 257 Meadow View Road, Bulls Gap, told deputies he'd left for work at 1 p.m. last Thursday and returned home Friday at 2 a.m., and during that time someone had entered his residence. Among the things reported stolen were the tongue rings, a set of four R-Tech 17-inch wheels valued at $1,200, handcuffs, a BB pistol, jewelry, six packs of Marlboro cigarettes, six blank checks, and a cell phone.


Arrests expected soon in Va. shooting

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GLADE SPRING - Washington County, Va., Sheriff Fred Newman says detectives are making progress in their investigation of a Glade Spring home invasion and shooting. According to authorities, the victim was seriously injured early Tuesday morning when two men invaded his home and shot him. Early indications are the two suspects left the Glade Spring residence without taking money or other items. "Our detectives have developed good leads as to persons who committed this crime," Newman stated in a press release. "Once additional information is obtained, we should be able to apprehend these individuals in the very near future." According to Newman, the home invasion occurred shortly after midnight at 10602 Forest Hills Drive. Witnesses said two men, each brandishing a handgun, kicked the front door open. "An altercation apparently occurred with the victim being shot in the abdomen," Newman said. The victim was treated for the gunshot wound at Bristol Regional Medical Center.


Lee woman sentenced on drug charge

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JONESVILLE - Christy Michelle Wilder, 26, P.O. Box 271, Jonesville, was sentenced Tuesday in Lee County Circuit Court to time served and completion of the diversion program after being convicted earlier of one count of possessing oxycodone. Judge John Kilgore sentenced Wilder to 12 months in jail and suspended all but time served in lieu of 12 months of supervised probation and completion of the program.


Jonesville woman gets 2 years for forgery

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JONESVILLE - Melanie Ann Warner, 34, Route 1, Box 156, Jonesville, was sentenced Tuesday in Lee County Circuit Court to concurrent five-year terms in the Virginia State Penitentiary after being found guilty earlier of one count each of forgery and uttering a forged check. Judge John Kilgore suspended three years of the time in lieu of three years of supervised probation and allowed 16 months of the time to be served concurrently with time she will begin serving in Tennessee this June. Upon release from Tennessee, Warner is to serve the remaining eight months in Virginia, and upon release here is to seek drug and alcohol counseling. She was further ordered to pay restitution of $50 per month.


Health Fair planned for Friday

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KINGSPORT - The Women's Home and Overseas Missionary Society will host a health fair Friday from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. at Bethel AME Zion Church, 812 Maple Oak Lane. The theme is "Young and Old, Knowledge is Power." A number of health professionals will be present to conduct screenings, and there will be a diabetes presentation at noon. The public is invited.


Friday is Fun Day at V.O. Dobbins

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KINGSPORT - The public is invited to Fun Day at V.O. Dobbins Park Friday from 3 to 9 p.m. There will be free food, and activities include face painting, a 30-foot water slide, an inflatable castle, a sack race, and an obstacle course. The food will include hot dogs, hamburgers, steaks, ribs, potato salad, green beans, baked beans, macaroni and cheese, sodas and bottled water. The public is invited. The event is being sponsored by Friends of the Community. For more information, call 246-1043.


New pharmacy schools springing up

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NASHVILLE - Responding to a growing demand for pharmacists, Belmont University will open a pharmacy school next year. So will Lipscomb University. And Union University. Among those three schools and East Tennessee State University, which opened its school in January, the state could go from having one pharmacy school to five in just a year and a half, which begs the question: Will the shortage of pharmacists become a glut?


The number of pharmacy schools nationwide already has increased from 84 to 101 in the past five years, said Lucinda Maine, executive vice president of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, and more schools are planned - not just in Tennessee. But Tennessee is unique in the rapid increase of schools planned. "Going from one school to five schools in a year or two years is really unprecedented," she said. "That's not happening any place else." Jennifer Athay, associate director of student development at the American Pharmacists Association, said, "I know there have been some discussions within the pharmacy profession about, ‘OK. When is it going to be too much?'" The new dean of Lipscomb's College of Pharmacy in Nashville said that is a fair question, but he doesn't think Tennessee has reached that point. "There's a huge need for health care services ... that's going to drive the need for pharmacists in the foreseeable future," Roger Davis said. The former assistant dean for Middle Tennessee at the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy in Memphis said the baby boomers are aging, but also living longer and will need medical care for many years to come. Also, drug innovations mean more problems can be treated with medication. Tennessee has a shortage of about 1,060 pharmacists and 157,000 are needed nationally, according to a Belmont news release. David S. Dockery, president of Union University in Jackson, said despite the other new programs, he thinks Union graduates will be able to find work as pharmacists. "The shortage - from all the statistics - is great," he said. "At least for the next 10 years, I don't see any saturation point." ETSU dean Larry Calhoun was even more optimistic. The Johnson City school's mission is to train pharmacists to work in rural communities where Calhoun said he thinks there will always be a need. Belmont officials in Nashville would not comment for this story, but referred to its media release sent Tuesday announcing its new program. In the release Jack Bovender, CEO of Nashville-based Hospital Corporation of America, made a case for the pharmacy school. "With over 80 million baby boomers not only in growing need of health care, but retiring from the health care industry, there are huge demands for health care professionals that we have to meet somehow," he said. AP-CS-04-11-07 1757EDT


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